“Daydreamers” by Glint

After teasing fans with the release of 2 EPs in 2015, the Nyack, NY based band
Glint has announced the upcoming release of their new full-length, Inverter. Due out Friday, March 11 via Votiv, it marks Glint’s first long-player for the label. Today the band shares the album track “Daydreamers”

To create Inverter, Jase Blankfort set up his studio in empty warehouses near his home in Nyack. “All the cubicles and desks were still there, but all the life had been suck out of the building,” he says. “I went into that weird corporate setting, set up my stuff in these different rooms, and let the environment take me away. That’s where some of the Glint sound comes from.”

As the creative force behind Glint, Blankfort is no fan of traditional recording studios, which can be sterile, institutional, or coldly clinical- more akin to a dentist office than a place to craft exuberant earworms of crazy-quilt pop arrangements. “Modern day recording studios can have a sterile environment with formulaic expectations, these abandoned warehouses in which we’ve assembled the Glint playground have allowed a vast unrestricted protected space in which we were able to grow and explore, you can hear the buildings in the record.” For Blankfort, it must come naturally, which is why he works better in unconventional spaces that have a strong connection to the real world, yet remain separate from it.

Inverter fills those huge spaces with everything from hip-hop beats to Britpop guitars, from orchestras to vintage synths, sequencers to shakers, laptop-pop blips to torch-ballad choruses. The warehouses allowed Blankfort to cloister himself off from the world with these songs, the better to obsess over their every detail. “Sometimes I’ll stay there for a weeks straight. Just live in that warehouse for a while. Eventually I’ll come back out for air.”

During the time it took to make Inverter, Glint grew from what had been essentially a solo project into a further developed “wall of sound.” Anders Fleming, drummer/multi-instrumentalist, became a new driving force to Glint’s anthemic “heartbeat.” Fleming was a teenager playing in a local band when Blankfort caught a show. Impressed by the kid’s nuanced, melodic style, he asked him to audition for Glint and “everything just clicked. He was young, but sounded so beyond his years.”

After setting down initial tracks among the corporate ghosts of Nyack, Blankfort and his small team of collaborators road tripped out to the wilds of rural Michigan, where they completed Inverter at The Loft, just outside Ann Arbor. It’s no ordinary recording studio, but an overhauled barn in the middle of a 100 acre horse farm. “It’s not frequented by a lot of artists,” says Blankfort. “The Loft is really just producer Tim Patalan opening his world to bands he thinks are doing something interesting.”

Despite the change in scenery, Blankfort felt he was in comfortable environs. “It reminded me of the warehouses, being the middle of nowhere and giving everything to this big, open space and letting it give back to you.”