Springtime Carnivore Announces new album

Springtime Carnivore Announces New Album "Midnight Room,"

Singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Greta Morgan AKA: Springtime Carnivore, has announced the release date of her second album Midnight Room, due out on October 7 via Autumn Tone Records. Today, she is sharing the first single “Face in the Moon”.

“‘Face in the Moon’ was written in a 15 minute flash after a week of lovelorn, sleepless nights watching space conspiracy documentaries and listening to Bruce Springsteen’s Nebraska & REM’s Murmur.” – Greta Morgan

Midnight Room is a record inspired by the unanchored sense of loss that follows deep heartbreak. It was produced by Chris Coady (Beach House, Future Islands), and features Morgan on vocals, guitar, synthesizers, piano, and percussion as well as La Sera’s Katy Goodman on background vocals, Alex Greenwald (Phases, Phantom Planet) on bass, and Jason Boesel (Rilo Kiley, Bright Eyes) on percussion.

Springtime Carnivore – Midnight Room
October 7, 2016 | Autumn Tone Records

1. Midnight Room
2. Face in the Moon
3. Into the Avalanche
4. Double Infinity
5. Raised By Wolves
6. Nude Polaroids
7. Under the Spell
8. Wires Crossing
9. Bad Dream Baby
10. Rough Magic

You know the curious, almost out-of-body feeling you sometimes get when you wake up in the middle of the night, where everything seems a bit fuzzy and you’re not sure if maybe you’re still dreaming? It’s a state Greta Morgan perpetually revisited during the second half of 2015, when she was writing and recording the new Springtime Carnivore album, Midnight Room. “I was on a really jagged sleep schedule,” says the Los Angeles-based singer-songwriter, describing the months during which she worked on the follow-up to her 2014 debut. “It was the first time I’d ever lived by myself, and there was this bizarre feeling at night of the house being so quiet and being so totally alone. And Midnight Room came out of that.”

Earlier in the year, Morgan went through one of those break-ups that completely topples your world. Though it was as amicable as those things can be, the twenty-eight year-old musician felt shattered. She began working on songs for Midnight Room during those strange waking interludes last summer, finding an abundance of beautiful melodies in the melancholy ether. “A lot of lyrics on the record are collaged or don’t necessarily make sense next to each other,” she says. “But I guess my whole headspace was like that for a few months. I felt like I couldn’t trust my memory completely — like i was space cadeting through the weird space between sleeping and dreaming and waking and reality.”

“How do you say good-bye to someone in a certain way and still keep him or her in your life? I feel like I was asking a lot of questions during the making of the record that I still don’t really have answers to, but at least some of the songs were exploring that territory.”

In the interest of achieving a more cohesive sound for Midnight Room, Morgan reached out to producer Chris Coady, whose work with Future Islands, Beach House and The Orwells she’d admired. “To me, Chris’s greatest gift as a producer is creating a sonic palette for an album that really brings their songs to life,” she says. “I wanted the whole thing to feel like you’re looking through a cobalt blue glass, and to get textures that almost feel like being able to see stars in the sky. I wanted it to have this very velvety midnight blue purity to the sound, and I feel like the synthesizers that we used and a lot of the guitar tones we used evoked that kind of visual texture.”