Frontman Tucker Jameson describes the meaning behind the unique band moniker as a callback to his childhood fear of venturing beyond shallow waters while learning to swim. “I think it was the pool floats casting their long shadows across the bottom of the pool that triggered those visions,” Jameson states. “Eventually, it became a bit of a child’s game. How far can you wade into the deep end? How long can you stay there before the sharks get you?”

Leaving behind their obligations in Texas, Sharks In The Deep End began the writing process holed up in a garage in Jameson’s home-state of Connecticut. For a month they worked alongside producer Dan Drohan (whose credits include Ang Low and indie darling Wilsen), to conceive the songs that would come to fill the binary code and vinyl grooves of their debut release. The songs were recorded at DeGraw Sound in Brooklyn before finishing up at Jim Eno’s Public Hi-Fi in Austin. “This was an experimental and eye opening experience,” Jameson recalls, who counts David Bowie, Talking Heads, Sam Cooke, and The Smiths, among his primary influences. “The approach was wholly new to us and I think resulted in a sound deeper and more layered.”

The haunting memory from his childhood now has broader significance to the twenty-something singer-songwriter. “These fears that we have, like sharks lurking in the depths of the pool, are often just fictions we make up… Killin’ Machine is the direct result of owning our fears and facing them head on.”