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CYMBALS is Dan, Jack, Neil and Luke. Some of them have played in bands before, but this one is different – it’s sort of a romantic thing, some kind of chemistry that makes the songs what they are.

In May 2011 they released their first 9 months of songs in an album called Unlearn through Tough Love, on limited hand-screen printed vinyl. The album quickly sold out, and interest has grown ever since.

With Unlearn, the band were figuring out what it meant to write together, a process that was mixed and produced by James Yuill, D/R/U/G/S and Rory Brattwell. The result was a snapshot of charming naivety, a document of their first year that has become dear to a horde of devoted fans.

Sideways Sometimes is a different beast. Recorded over five days on Lightship 95, a boat moored in the Thames, the EP has a cleaner, more coherent feel. Fourth member Neil Gillespie took over from Sean on drums, while Sean returned to his first instrument, bass, filling out the space in their sound. Drawing on Yo La Tengo and New Order, the songs follow a pattern, a circle describing a moment in their lives.

Having released Sideways, Sometimes in April 2012, CYMBALS returned later that year with new track ‘Like An Animal’. Released as part of a four track 12” which features the title song, an instrumental version, and two remixes from Fort Romeau and Maria Minerva respectively, it’s the first evidence of the band’s pairing with producer Dreamtrak.

Bold, brash and perhaps somewhat unexpected, ‘Like An Animal’ is a 9-minute statement of intent that brings to life the band’s often stated affinity with house music, while retaining the deft melodicism for which they’ve been recognised. More at home on the dancefloor than any of their previous releases, ‘Like An Animal’ still remains refreshingly off kilter, the jacking beat embellished by a subtle violin part that few of their peers would think to include.

Fresh from the success of ‘Like An Animal’, CYMBALS returned at the start of 2013 with ‘The Natural World’. As with their previous single, it was recorded and produced by Dreamtrak (aka Oli Horton), filtered through the dancefloor sheen Horton is becoming known for, and then mixed by Daniel Rejmer – the dab hand behind both Foals’ Total Life Forever and Everything Everything’s Man Alive. Their respective talents aside, the result is quintessentially CYMBALS – a spangly gem torn from Little Dragon’s ‘Ritual Union’ and refracted through the mist of one of those wintry twilights that descend upon a deserted East End nightly.

CYMBALS Announce US Tour Dates ; Share New Video

CYMBALS Announce US Tour Dates; Share New Video

London four-piece CYMBALS have shared a new video for “The End,” the seven minute-plus centre piece of their new album The Age Of Fracture which is now out via Tough Love Records. The video was directed by Matthew Reed, who also directed their video for “Erosion,” and it can be watched here,

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London four-piece CYMBALS have shared a new video for "Erosion." According to Tough Love Records boss Stephen Pietrzykowski the video is a playful critique of "the Buzzfeed/clickbait/endless-rivers-of-meaningless-shit aesthetic

CYMBALS shares new video for “Erosion”

London four-piece CYMBALS have shared a new video for “Erosion.” According to Tough Love Records boss Stephen Pietrzykowski the video is a playful critique of “the Buzzfeed/clickbait/endless-rivers-of-meaningless-shit aesthetic,

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Cymbals Debuts "Winter '98" From their Upcoming album "The Age Of Fracture", out February 4th 2014 on Tough Love Records. "Winter '98" is now streaming.

Cymbals Debuts “Winter ’98” From Upcoming LP

CYMBALS have today shared the opening track from their new album The Age Of Fracture. “Winter ’98” is available to stream now. A few chords of “Winter 98” were first head closing the short film with which CYMBALS first announced The Age Of Fracture. The film,

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CYMBALS debuts "Erosion" from The Age of Fracture, out 2/4 on Tough Love Records

CYMBALS Share “Erosion” Off Upcoming Album

The new album from CYMBALS is named after a book by Princeton academic, Daniel T. Rodgers, which addresses the fragmentation of ideas towards the end of the last century and how collective meanings have become uncertain. Singer and guitarist Jack Cleverly writes:

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